Friday, August 18, 2017

Homebrew Wind Power

Related Homemade Wind Power Products

Comments

  1. W. Hermans says:
    14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Better than expected, but not perfect., July 30, 2009
    By 
    W. Hermans (Snowflake, AZ) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Homebrew Wind Power (Paperback)
    First I must say, the “don’t go there” comment was written in the forward of the book, which was not written by the author(s).

    This book does a very good job of teaching the reader just about every aspect concerning Wind related RE subjects ( plus how to build a single design ). Chapter 1-6 explains the basics starting with an introduction to wind power, ending in shop safety. Chapters 7-8 cover the tools you will need to build from scratch. This basically is just the two types of molds, and a coil winder. Chapters 9-16 cover the parts you need to build( including fabricating your own parts, and buying a few ), and put together a complete 10′ proven wind turbine. This is nothing you can not learn by reading their web pages. However, the book serves as a very good offline reference, and is well organized ( This is one thing Hugh could definitely learn from these two – Organization ). Chapters 17-18 cover towers, and raising respectively. Chapter 19 is experiences with failures, while chapter 20 is called scaling it up or down.

    Where it falls short is in the last chapter “scaling it up and down”. This chapter I felt could have been much bigger, and covered more than what it actually did. I felt that the authors were in a rush, and were tired of writing the book at this point. How , and what to use when laminating the wood together for the 17′ blades is a huge omission, and sorely missed. Also when talking about MPPT design controllers ( in another earlier chapter ), they briefly bring up the topic, and then nothing else. Sorry guys ” Some people <this or that> ” does not convey the topic well at all, and could have been easily left out. A little research on MPPT was all that was required, and you could have informed your reader on the subject a bit more. Another subtraction from the book was all the “Doggy Haiku”. Enough said on the later subject . . .

    So, with all the above said, it is not a terrible book, and I did actually find it mostly enjoyable to read ( and once again, it will serve as a great reference ). However, as stated above at least once, and in the title as well, it could have been better. The amazon price keeps this book from falling into the 3 star category in my opinion.

    As an aside, we have had 30 dogs here at one point, so no, I do not hate dogs.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. S. Schisler "esully1" says:
    27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    the book pretty good…the author…not so much, June 3, 2009
    By 
    S. Schisler “esully1″ (Rockledge, Fl) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Homebrew Wind Power (Paperback)
    I wasn’t for sure if the author wanted me to build a wind turbine or if he was just bragging about how smart he was, how dumb I was and why I evan decided to read a book on building wind turbines. Just an example he starts the book off with, “My initial response whenever questioned about what’s involved in building a wind generator from scratch is, “Don’t go there!”.” Then he launches into everything that makes him qualified to build one and you, not so much. Not surprising this is a running theme througout the book. So much so that I got depressed and just stopped reading cause I obviously knew nothing and anything that I built, if I built anything, would not be as efficient as his work of art. I was able to ignore the pyhcological abuse enough to get the gist of the parts needed to build one. Though it obviously is not as efficient.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. John Bass "Senior Engineer" says:
    70 of 93 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Poor Engineering — High Risk, July 19, 2009
    By 
    John Bass “Senior Engineer” (Masonville, CO) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Homebrew Wind Power (Paperback)
    The DanB “heavy duty” 48V stator from his web site says “This stator is wound with #15 gage wire. It has 9 coils and each coil has 105 turns in it. […] The coils are wired in 3 phase star configuration […] In our tests we believe this stator will be about 50% efficient at 1000 Watts. Sustained output above about 1000 Watts may overheat this stator”.

    There are easy ways to get generator and rectification efficiency up above 97%, so that almost all of the harvested wind power available from the prop ends up in the batteries. Burning more than half of it in the generator and rectification is simply poor engineering.

    The down side of 50% efficient as the author notes, is that this becomes an unsafe heater that violates NEC and UL standards in high winds … creating a high fire risk … and a risk that your insurance will not cover the damage or loss of life since the product is not UL rated.

    A good efficient UL listed design would never get warm. We need NEC/UL safe products for use in forest and wild land areas to keep from starting fires that place people at risk, or worse yet kill.

    Missing completely are accurate auditable specifications, performance data, and efficiency data to be able to calculate Return-On-Investment and production estimates. They need to specify critical prop data, like efficiency (Cp) and Tip Speed Ratios as a series of curves over various wind and load. They need to do the same for the generator designs. There is a lot of bashing of VAWT and micro-turbine HAWT designs based on performance claims, yet this product completely fails to accurately present it’s auditable performance numbers for comparison. With the author recongnizing 50% generator efficiency, and highly mixed Cp claims, this product is very likely to only produce 25-45% of Betz.

    They published this themselves, and it lacks the editorial review and facts checking that a major publisher would invest to protect their brand.

    We need “responsible” advocacy in this market, that includes looking well past what is accepted practice. Everybody in the homebrew market has been doing it this way for a long time … and it’s just flat wrong.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Speak Your Mind


Fatal error: Call to undefined function pp_popup_id() in /home/homemade/public_html/wp-content/themes/genesis/footer.php on line 26